How to setup vsftpd FTP with SSL on Ubuntu 12.04

This tutorial teaches you, how to setup vsftpd server on Linux based dedicated Web server. The tutorial also teaches you how to add the ftp users and lock the directory to individual users(In this scenario,lock the users into their individual web directory).

In Ubuntu 12.04, vsftpd with chrooted users gives the following error message:

500 OOPS: vsftpd: refusing to run with writable root inside chroot ()
To overcome this problem, we need to add the following vsftpd PPA:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:thefrontiergroup/vsftpd

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Many-To-One Mappings IIS

Many-to-one Client certificate mapping is used by the Internet Information Services (IIS) to associate an end user to a windows account when the client certificate is used for the user authentication. The user session is executed under the context of this mapped windows account by IIS. For this to work we need to ensure that the certificate to account mapping is configured correctly in IIS.

In IIS 6.0, the user had the option to configure Many-to-One client certificate mapping through the IIS Manager User Interface. In IIS 7/7.5, we don’t have such an interface for either One-to-One or Many-to-One mappings. This post talks about the Configuration Editor IIS 7/7.5 extension that can be used to achieve the mappings either for One-to-One or Many-to-One. Here we will talk in specific about Many-to-1 mapping.

IIS 7 or IIS 7.5 Schema

This is the schema for the IIS Client Certificate Mapping authentication feature in IIS 7 or IIS 7.5.
Prerequisites

These are the prerequisites needed for this walkthrough.
1.We have installed IIS Client Certificate Mapping module on the server.
2.A Web Site is configured with an HTTPS binding which can accept SSL connections.
3.We have a client certificate installed on the client.
4.IIS 7 Administration Pack is installed on the IIS 7.0 server. NOTE: Configuration Editor is shipped by default on IIS 7.5.

Walkthrough

Step 1:

1. Launch the IIS manager and select your web site which is being configured for client certificate authentication.

2. In the features View select Configuration Editor under Management section in the Features View.
3. Go to "system.webServer/security/authentication/iisClientCertificateMappingAuthentication" in the drop down box as shown below:

You will see a window to configure Many-to-One or One-to-One certificate mappings here. This is the UI provided through Configuration editor from where we can setup all the mapping configurations.

4. We can go ahead and modify the properties through this GUI.
•Set enabled to true
•Set manyToOneCertificateMappingsEnabled to True
•Select manyToOneMappings and click on the extreme end at the Ellipsis button to launch the new window for configuring mappings.

5. Under this new window go ahead and Add a new item. You can modify the properties from within the window as shown below:

6. Click on the Ellipsis button for rules and this will give you an option to add multiple patterns for matching based on certificate properties.

So here above we have two entries for rules for mapping the certificate. In the above case we are using two different fields named Subject and the Issuer in the certificate field and based on the matchcriteria property map the certificate to the account mydomain\testuser.

Shown below is how the final mapping for a specific windows account looks like. As you can see there are two entries for rules for this account.
Similarly we can have other mappings for various accounts based on the fields “Issuer” and “Subject” in the Certificate.

Download the details with screenshot from here configuring-many-to-one-client-certificate-mappings-for-iis-7-7-5

Relevant Sources:

http://www.iis.net/learn/manage/configuring-security/configuring-one-to-one-client-certificate-mappings

http://blogs.iis.net/webtopics/archive/2010/04/27/configuring-many-to-one-client-certificate-mappings-for-iis-7-7-5.aspx

http://www.iis.net/learn/manage/configuring-security/configuring-one-to-one-client-certificate-mappings

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Force HTTPS / SSL using .htaccess and mod_rewrite

Sometimes you may need to make sure that the user is browsing your site over securte connection. An easy to way to always redirect the user to secure connection (https://) can be accomplished with a .htaccess file containing the following lines:

RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{SERVER_PORT} 80
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ https://www.example.com/$1 [R,L]

Please, note that the .htaccess should be located in the web site main folder.

In case you wish to force HTTPS for a particular folder you can use:

RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{SERVER_PORT} 80
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} somefolder
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ https://www.domain.com/somefolder/$1 [R,L]

The .htaccess file should be placed in the folder where you need to force HTTPS.

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Windows Apache SSL

Step 1 – What You Need

A copy of Apache that includes SSL support.
A copy of OpenSSL.
An openssl.cnf file.

The copy of Apache that I had installed on my machine did not include SSL support, so I moseyed on down to the Apache download page. You’ll notice on that page that there are files named something like apache_2.2.11-win32-x86-openssl-0.9.8i.msi, as well as files named something like apache_2.2.11-win32-x86-no_ssl.msi. You need to have the openssl version installed, not the no_ssl version (duh). I couldn’t find any reliable info on manually adding SSL support to a no_ssl install, so I simply downloaded the most up-to-date version of the openssl installer and ran it. It successfully upgraded my version of Apache without overwriting any of my existing config files.

The nice thing about that installer is that it includes a copy of OpenSSL, so you don’t need to download that separately.

Finally, you need an openssl.cnf file, which doesn’t come with the package. I downloaded one that works from Neil’s site. If that link is broken you can find a copy attached to this blog post. I have Apache installed in C:\Apache\, which means that I can find OpenSSL in C:\Apache\bin\, so I copied the openssl.cnf file into that directory.
Step 2 – Create a Self-Signed Certificate

This step will create a number of files related to your certificate. Each of those files has the same name, with a different extension. In the example commands below I’ve used the name bob. Feel free to replace that with anything you like.

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