Windows Apache SSL

Open a command prompt and switch to the directory that contains OpenSSL (C:\Apache\bin\, in my case). To create a new certificate request type the following:
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openssl req -config openssl.cnf -new -out bob.csr -keyout bob.pem

You’ll be prompted to answer a bunch of questions, the answers to which can all be left blank except for:
PEM pass phrase: This is the password associated with the private key (bob.pem) that you’re generating. This will only be used in the next step, so make it anything you like, but don’t forget it.
Common Name: This should be the fully-qualified domain name associated with this certificate. I was creating a certificate for a site on my local machine which I browsed to via http://savacms/, so I just entered savacms. If I was creating a cert for my blog I would have entered www.silverwareconsulting.com.

When the command completes you should have a two files called bob.csr and bob.pem in your folder.

Now we need to create a non-password protected key for Apache to use:
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openssl rsa -in bob.pem -out bob.key

You’ll be prompted for the password that you created above, after which a file called bob.key should appear in your folder.

Finally, we need to create an X.509 certificate, which Apache also requires:
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openssl x509 -in bob.csr -out bob.cert -req -signkey bob.key -days 365

And that’s it – you now have a self-signed certificate that Apache can use to enable SSL. I chose to move the required files from C:\Apache\bin\ to C:\Apache\conf\ssl\, but you can put them anywhere as you’ll be pointing to them in your Apache config files.

Step 3 – Enable SSL on Apache

Open your httpd.conf file (which for me is in C:\Apache\conf\) and uncomment (remove the # sign) the following lines:

#LoadModule ssl_module modules/mod_ssl.so
#Include conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf

Open your httpd-ssl.conf file (which for me is in C:\Apache\conf\extra\) and update the section entitled <VirtualHost _default_:443>. You’ll need to update the values of ServerAdmin, DocumentRoot, ServerName, ErrorLog and CustomLog to match your environment. You’ll also need to point SSLCertificateFile to your .cert file and SSLCertificateKeyFile to your .key file.

Restart Apache and browse to https://localhost/. You’re now accessing your Apache server over SSL!

Step 4 – Create a VirtualHost Entry for Your Site

If you’re like me, you’re running Apache because you want to run multiple sites on your local machine. In that case you undoubtedly have multiple <VirtualHost> entries in your httpd-vhosts.conf file. In order to access a particular site via SSL, you need to add an additional <VirtualHost> entry for it. To illustrate I’ll show you an existing <VirtualHost> entry that I have, and then the new <VirtualHost> that I created to allow me to access that site via SSL. Here’s the original entry:
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<VirtualHost *:80>
ServerAdmin bob.silverberg@gmail.com
DocumentRoot C:/wwwroot/savaCMS
ServerName savaCMS
DirectoryIndex index.html, index.cfm
ErrorLog logs/savaCMS-error_log
CustomLog logs/savaCMS-access_log common
<Directory C:/wwwroot/savaCMS>
Options All
AllowOverride All
</Directory>
</VirtualHost>

And here’s the additional entry that I added:
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<VirtualHost *:443>
SSLEngine on
SSLCipherSuite ALL:!ADH:!EXPORT56:RC4+RSA:+HIGH:+MEDIUM:+LOW:+SSLv2:+EXP:+eNULL
SSLCertificateFile “C:/Apache/conf/ssl/savacms.cert”
SSLCertificateKeyFile “C:/Apache/conf/ssl/savacms.key”
ServerAdmin bob.silverberg@gmail.com
DocumentRoot C:/wwwroot/savaCMS
ServerName savaCMS
DirectoryIndex index.html, index.cfm
ErrorLog logs/savaCMS-error_log
CustomLog logs/savaCMS-access_log common
<Directory C:/wwwroot/savaCMS>
Options All
AllowOverride All
</Directory>
</VirtualHost>

I can now browse to http://savaCMS/ as well as https://savaCMS/! Hopefully these instructions will be found by the next person who chooses to attempt this.

Src: http://www.silverwareconsulting.com/index.cfm/2009/3/31/Enabling-SSL-on-Apache-on-Windows

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