Convert .ova and import it on Proxmox KVM virtualization

Let’s start uploading the exported ova file to the proxmox server. Extract the OVA file:

tar -xvf *.ova

This should output a couple of files from the OVA container, it should include an OVF file, which is the VM Defenition file, and a VMDK file, which is the actual hard disk image. Again, this may take a while.

Convert the vmdk to a Proxmox compatible qcow2 file:

qemu-img convert -f vmdk myvirtual-disk1.vmdk  -O qcow2 qcowdisk.qcow2

We now need to get the image into a VM with some hardware so that we can begin to use it. This is where things get tricky – the OVF file is not compatible with Proxmox and needs to be manually understood. The principle here is we are going to use the Proxmox web GUI to create a VM and replace the empty disk image which is created with our recently converted qcow2 image.

You can use vi to open the OVF file and understand some of the basic settings which are required for the VM. Open the OVF file and look for the following XML tags:

  • OperatingSystemSection
  • VirtualHardwareSection
  • Network
  • StorageControllers

Continue reading “Convert .ova and import it on Proxmox KVM virtualization” »

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Fix on connecting to NFS server from Proxmox Centos 7 Container

I hope you already know how to allow NFS from proxmox host server. if not, you may read my earlier post:

NFS fix on LXC Host Server

I was actually receiving a error like below:

# mount -t nfsd nfsd /proc/fs/nfsd
mount: nfsd is write-protected, mounting read-only
mount: cannot mount nfsd read-only

My proxmox edition was 5.0-30 and my CentOS was 7.

However, this is a bit different rather looking the other one as mentioned above. I was experiencing connecting my Centos 7 LXC container to a NFS server in the network. The regular tweak didn’t work. So, had to spend a while googling the solution. Found the correct one on a forum thread. But eventually it worked. For this you need to edit the file

nano /etc/pve/lxc/<your container ID>.conf

Add the below line in the conf file:

lxc.aa_profile: unconfined

Reboot the container. And now try to connect the NFS server. It should work.

 

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Enable VNC viewer for Proxmox 2.x/3.x with tightvnc

Configure Proxmox host for TLS connections: This configures the host to accept VNC connections.

aptitude install openbsd-inetd

Run this to get your KVM id’s :

qm list
root@homenet-home10 /etc # qm list
VMID NAME STATUS MEM(MB) BOOTDISK(GB) PID 
101 freenas stopped 1024 32.00 0 
102 debpbx running 512 0.00 573304 
105 winxp stopped 512 15.01 0 
7012 ltsp-ldap-openfire-KVM running 512 9.00 495870 
7016 fbc16-kvm running 512 8.00 462697 
7159 win7 stopped 2048 0.00 0 
27014 ltsp-term-KVM stopped 512 0.00 0

edit /etc/inetd.conf , put a port for each kvm you want to access using kvm

#port kvm
59055 stream tcp nowait root /usr/sbin/qm qm vncproxy 105
59058 stream tcp nowait root /usr/sbin/qm qm vncproxy 7159

restart openbsd-inetd Continue reading “Enable VNC viewer for Proxmox 2.x/3.x with tightvnc” »

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Phpvirtualbox fix on 5.1 using 5.0

I was able to get v5.0-5 working with vbox 5.1 by commenting out the version check line and replacing it with a static value in the endpoints/api.php file:

// $response['data']['responseData']['phpvboxver'] = @constant('PHPVBOX_VER');
 $response['data']['responseData']['phpvboxver'] = "5.1-0";

Src: https://sourceforge.net/p/phpvirtualbox/discussion/general/thread/565b7f31/

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User Management in Proxmox

Proxmox VE authentication server
This is a unix like password store (/etc/pve/priv/shadow.cfg). Password are encrypted using the SHA-256 hash method. Users are allowed to change passwords.

Terms and Definitions

Users

A Proxmox VE user name consists of 2 parts: <userid>@<realm>. The login screen on the GUI shows them a separate items, but it is internally used as single string.

We store the following attribute for users (/etc/pve/user.cfg):

  • first name
  • last name
  • email address
  • expiration date
  • flag to enable/disable account
  • comment
  • Superuser

The traditional unix superuser account is called ‘root@pam’. All system mails are forwarded to the email assigned to that account. Continue reading “User Management in Proxmox” »

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Understanding Virtualbox network interfaces

To create and experiment with all kinds of networks without the risk (or taking the trouble) of creating an actual one. And here is where VirtualBox excels by providing several options for networking out of the box. VirtualBox installs an additional NIC (Network Interface Card) on your host computer to identify itself while communicating with the guest. By default the host gets an IP address of 192.168.56.1. You can change the network modes, IP and other network settings by right-clicking your virtual machine on the left and clicking Settings. These are the networking modes that work with VirtualBox guest computers:

NAT (Default)
Host-only Network (Most secure)
Bridged Network (Least secure)
Internal-Network (Betweeen guests only)
Not Attached (No connectivity, guest isolated)
NAT: By default, the networking mode for your virtual machine is NAT (Network Address Translation) mode. This works something like this: Continue reading “Understanding Virtualbox network interfaces” »

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Virtualbox Disk Reduce or Disk Compact

You have to do the following steps:

1. Run defrag in the guest (Windows only)

Nullify free space: With a Linux Guest run this:

sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/bigemptyfile bs=4096k
sudo rm -rf /bigemptyfile

Or:

telinit 1
mount -o remount,ro /dev/sda1
zerofree -v /dev/sda1

Or

sudo apt-get install secure-delete
sfill -f -z -l -l -I -v /

Continue reading “Virtualbox Disk Reduce or Disk Compact” »

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