Disable ipv6 on Linux Machine

Disable on Centos/RHEL system:

1. Append below lines in /etc/sysctl.conf:

net.ipv6.conf.all.disable_ipv6 = 1
net.ipv6.conf.default.disable_ipv6 = 1

NOTE : To disable IPv6 on a single interface add below lines to /etc/sysctl.conf :

net.ipv6.conf.[interface].disable_ipv6 = 1 ### put interface name here [interface]
net.ipv6.conf.default.disable_ipv6 = 1

2. To make the settings affective, execute :

# sysctl -p

Disable on Debian/Ubuntu system:

One method to make this option persist is modifying /etc/sysctl.conf.  Add the following lines to the file:

net.ipv6.conf.all.disable_ipv6=1
net.ipv6.conf.default.disable_ipv6=1
net.ipv6.conf.lo.disable_ipv6=1

For the settings to take effect use:

sudo sysctl -p
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Install Development Tool on CentOS and Debian

Well, in my working domain I face these tools to be installed, so that most of the dependent tools or programs that need to be deployed later don’t face much of dependency issue. So here goes the installation process for both the OS.

On CentOS/RHEL system use the follwoing command (either one of it would work)-

Type the following yum command as root user:

# yum group install "Development Tools"

Continue reading “Install Development Tool on CentOS and Debian” »

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Install Proxmox VE 7 on Debian 11 (Bullseye)

Step 1: Update Debian OS

Ensure your Debian 11 (Bullseye) operating system is upgraded.

sudo apt -y update && sudo apt -y upgrade

Once the upgrade process is complete, reboot the server

sudo systemctl reboot

Step 2: Set Proxmox Server hostname

Let’s set a hostname on the server

sudo hostnamectl set-hostname proxmox7node01.example.com --static

Replaceproxmox7node01.example.com with correct hostname you’re setting on your system. Get the IP address of the primary interface: Continue reading “Install Proxmox VE 7 on Debian 11 (Bullseye)” »

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Delete Old Unused Kernels in Debian

To find out the current version of Linux kernel running on your system, use the following command.

$ uname -sr
Linux 4.12.0-041200-generic

To list all installed kernels on your system, issue this command.

$ dpkg -l | grep linux-image | awk '{print$2}'

linux-image-4.12.0-041200-generic
linux-image-4.8.0-22-generic
linux-image-extra-4.8.0-22-generic
linux-image-generic

Remove Old Unused Kernels on Debian and Ubuntu

Run the commands below to remove a particular linux-image along with its configuration files, then update grub2 configuration, and lastly reboot the system.

$ sudo apt remove --purge linux-image-4.4.0-21-generic
$ sudo update-grub2
$ sudo reboot
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Install Cacti 1.2 on Debian 11

First, update the repository index.

sudo apt update

Install MariaDB Database

Install MariaDB from Official MariaDB Mirror

Update the repository index and install the required packages.

sudo apt update
sudo apt install -y software-properties-common dirmngr apt-transport-https wget curl

Add signing key to your system.

curl -fsSL https://mariadb.org/mariadb_release_signing_key.asc | sudo gpg --dearmor -o /usr/share/keyrings/mariadb-keyring.gpg

MariaDB foundation offers a repository for Debian to install MariaDB easily. You can choose any one of the download mirrors from the MariaDB download page to set up the repository on your system.

Add MariaDB repository using the below command.

echo 'deb [arch=amd64 signed-by=/usr/share/keyrings/mariadb-keyring.gpg] http://nyc2.mirrors.digitalocean.com/mariadb/repo/10.6/debian bullseye main' | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mariadb.list

Install MariaDB server and client using the following command.

sudo apt update
sudo apt install -y mariadb-server mariadb-client

Continue reading “Install Cacti 1.2 on Debian 11” »

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Creating a Sudo User in Debian or Ubuntu

Creating a Debian Sudo User

Creating a Debian sudo user involves a few simple steps. This procedure does not require you to edit the sudoers file. If you have an existing user that you want to grant sudo privileges, skip Step 2.

Step 1: Log in as the Root User

Before you can add a user to your system, log in to your server as the root user:

ssh root@ip_address

Replace ip_address with the IP address of your server. Continue reading “Creating a Sudo User in Debian or Ubuntu” »

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Remove Old Kernels of Debian/Ubuntu

To find out the current version of Linux kernel running on your system, use the following command.

$ uname -sr
Linux 4.12.0-041200-generic

To list all installed kernels on your system, issue this command.

$ dpkg -l | grep linux-image | awk '{print$2}'

linux-image-4.12.0-041200-generic
linux-image-4.8.0-22-generic
linux-image-extra-4.8.0-22-generic
linux-image-generic

Remove Old Unused Kernels on Debian and Ubuntu

Run the commands below to remove a particular linux-image along with its configuration files, then update grub2 configuration, and lastly reboot the system.

$ sudo apt remove --purge linux-image-4.4.0-21-generic
$ sudo update-grub2
$ sudo reboot

Removing Old Kernel in Ubuntu Continue reading “Remove Old Kernels of Debian/Ubuntu” »

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Install Proxmox VE 7 on Debian 11 (Bullseye)

In this guide, we will cover a step-by-step installation of Proxmox VE 7 virtualization software on Debian 11 (Bullseye) Linux system. It’s recommended to deploy Proxmox VE server from a Bare-metal_ISO_Installer, but it’s sometimes inevitable to deploy it on a running instance of Debian 11 (Bullseye) server.

Setup Pre-requisites

For the installation of Proxmox VE 7 on Debian 11 (Bullseye), you need the following requirements to be met;

  • A running instance of Debian Bullseye
  • A 64-bit processor with support for the Intel 64 or AMD64 CPU extensions.
  • Access to Debian server terminal as root or standard user with sudo
  • Server needs internet access
  • Enough hardware resources to be used in Virtualizing other operating systems

Continue reading “Install Proxmox VE 7 on Debian 11 (Bullseye)” »

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Install Netxtcloud on Debian 10

Install Apache, MariaDB and PHP

NextCloud runs on the webserver, written in PHP and uses MariaDB to store their data. So you will need to install Apache, MariaDB, PHP and other required packages on your system. You can install all of them by running the following command:

apt-get install apache2 libapache2-mod-php mariadb-server php-xml php-cli php-cgi php-mysql php-mbstring php-gd php-curl php-zip wget unzip -y

Once all the packages are installed, open the php.ini file and tweak some recommended settings:

nano /etc/php/7.3/apache2/php.ini

Change the following settings:

memory_limit = 512M
upload_max_filesize = 1024M
post_max_size = 1024M
max_execution_time = 300
date.timezone = Asia/Dhaka

Save and close the file when you are finished. Then, start the Apache and MariaDB service and enable them to start after system reboot with the following command: Continue reading “Install Netxtcloud on Debian 10” »

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Softether Linux Client using Bridged with Softether VPN Server

It’s assumed that you already have a vpn server deployed in your network, created user, password and enabled bridged network during vpn server configuration. A sample snippet of VPN Server Bridge enabled is below-

So here’re the setup value-

  • On Softether Server IP- 103.146.221.30/24 and Gateway- 103.146.221.1
  • Client Server IP- 123.49.47.245/24, Gateway- 123.49.47.1 Once the server is connected to the vpn, it will be using 103.146.221.5 as bridged IP.

Let’s start.

My setup was done on Debian-10 fresh installation, should work on any linux distro though, it’s simple. The dependency packages that I needed were development tools/build-essentials and few other which were installed as below-

apt-get update
apt-get install build-essential gcc openssl apt-transport-https

Continue reading “Softether Linux Client using Bridged with Softether VPN Server” »

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