Reinstall VirtualBox on Ubuntu & CentOS

For Ubuntu

To remove virtualbox

sudo dpkg --list virtualbox-*
sudo apt autoremove --purge virtualbox*
dpkg -l virtualbox* | grep ^i

Remove all PPAs from sources.list and source.list.d directory

mkdir ~/apt-tmp
sudo mv /etc/apt/sources.list.d/* ~/apt-tmp

Make sure there is nothing except official repositories sources in /etc/sources.list. And update your sources:

sudo apt update

Now we can search to see which versions are available to install:

apt-cache madison virtualbox | grep -iv sources

Which produces an output like this:

virtualbox | 5.0.32-dfsg-0ubuntu1.16.04.2 | http://mirrors.kernel.org/ubuntu xenial-updates/multiverse amd64 Packages
virtualbox | 5.0.18-dfsg-2build1 | http://mirrors.kernel.org/ubuntu xenial/multiverse amd64 Packages

Then I would install the last version mentioned in xenial-updates: Continue reading “Reinstall VirtualBox on Ubuntu & CentOS” »

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Resizing a VirtualBox Virtual Hard Disk

Prerequisites
Before you start this procedure you’ll need to do the following.

  • Make sure you have the VBoxManage command-line tool installed on your host system.
  • Download the ISO for a GParted Live CD or else a Linux Live CD using a Linux distribution that includes the GParted partition editor utility.
  • IMPORTANT: If the virtual disk you want to resize is attached to a virtual machine with snapshots, you will need to delete these snapshots so that all disk state information is merged into the base virtual disk VDI file.
  • Resize the virtual disk (VirtualBox version 4.0+ only)
    If you are using VirtualBox version 4.0 or later, you can resize the logical capacity of a virtual disk using the VBoxManage modifyhd –resize command.

On the host system, run the following command:

cd /path/to/vbox/disks
VBoxManage modifyhd OldDisk.vdi –-resize 30000

where OldDisk.vdi is the filename of the virtual disk VDI file you want enlarge and 30000 is the new maximum size (in megabytes) of the virtual disk.

If your host OS is Windows, then the commands you need to enter at the Command Prompt will look more like the following. Continue reading “Resizing a VirtualBox Virtual Hard Disk” »

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Install VirtualBox on Centos 6 / 7

Step 1 – Add Required Yum Repositories

Firstly you are required to add VirtualBox yum repository in your system. Download repository file from its official site and place it under at /etc/yum.repos.d/virtualbox.repo .First navigate to /etc/yum.repos.d/ directory and use one of below commands as per your operating system.

cd /etc/yum.repos.d/
wget http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/rpm/rhel/virtualbox.repo

The CentOS and RedHat users also required to add EPEL yum repository using one of the following commands.

### On CentOS/RHEL 7 ### 
rpm -Uvh http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/epel-release-latest-7.noarch.rpm
### On CentOS/RHEL 6 ### 
rpm -Uvh http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm

Step 2 – Install Required Packages

Before installing VirtualBox make sure to install all required packages to run VirtualBox like kernel-headers, kernel-devels etc. Use the following command to install the required packages. Continue reading “Install VirtualBox on Centos 6 / 7” »

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Converting OVA for use with KVM / QCOW2

The OVA file is nothing more than a TAR archive, containing the .OVF and .VMDK files. Easy!

Using Evergreen ILS for example:

~ $ file Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze.ova

Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze.ova: POSIX tar archive (GNU). I’ts possible to use the tar command to list the contents

~ $ tar -tf Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze.ova 
Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze.ovf
Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze-disk1.vmdk

Simply extract those things…

~ $ tar -xvf Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze.ova
Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze.ovf
Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze-disk1.vmdk

Continue reading “Converting OVA for use with KVM / QCOW2” »

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Convert .ova and import it on Proxmox KVM virtualization

Let’s start uploading the exported ova file to the proxmox server. Extract the OVA file:

tar -xvf *.ova

This should output a couple of files from the OVA container, it should include an OVF file, which is the VM Defenition file, and a VMDK file, which is the actual hard disk image. Again, this may take a while.

Convert the vmdk to a Proxmox compatible qcow2 file:

qemu-img convert -f vmdk myvirtual-disk1.vmdk  -O qcow2 qcowdisk.qcow2

We now need to get the image into a VM with some hardware so that we can begin to use it. This is where things get tricky – the OVF file is not compatible with Proxmox and needs to be manually understood. The principle here is we are going to use the Proxmox web GUI to create a VM and replace the empty disk image which is created with our recently converted qcow2 image.

You can use vi to open the OVF file and understand some of the basic settings which are required for the VM. Open the OVF file and look for the following XML tags:

  • OperatingSystemSection
  • VirtualHardwareSection
  • Network
  • StorageControllers

Continue reading “Convert .ova and import it on Proxmox KVM virtualization” »

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Phpvirtualbox fix on 5.1 using 5.0

I was able to get v5.0-5 working with vbox 5.1 by commenting out the version check line and replacing it with a static value in the endpoints/api.php file:

// $response['data']['responseData']['phpvboxver'] = @constant('PHPVBOX_VER');
 $response['data']['responseData']['phpvboxver'] = "5.1-0";

Src: https://sourceforge.net/p/phpvirtualbox/discussion/general/thread/565b7f31/

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Understanding Virtualbox network interfaces

To create and experiment with all kinds of networks without the risk (or taking the trouble) of creating an actual one. And here is where VirtualBox excels by providing several options for networking out of the box. VirtualBox installs an additional NIC (Network Interface Card) on your host computer to identify itself while communicating with the guest. By default the host gets an IP address of 192.168.56.1. You can change the network modes, IP and other network settings by right-clicking your virtual machine on the left and clicking Settings. These are the networking modes that work with VirtualBox guest computers:

NAT (Default)
Host-only Network (Most secure)
Bridged Network (Least secure)
Internal-Network (Betweeen guests only)
Not Attached (No connectivity, guest isolated)
NAT: By default, the networking mode for your virtual machine is NAT (Network Address Translation) mode. This works something like this: Continue reading “Understanding Virtualbox network interfaces” »

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Virtualbox Disk Reduce or Disk Compact

You have to do the following steps:

1. Run defrag in the guest (Windows only)

Nullify free space: With a Linux Guest run this:

sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/bigemptyfile bs=4096k
sudo rm -rf /bigemptyfile

Or:

telinit 1
mount -o remount,ro /dev/sda1
zerofree -v /dev/sda1

Or

sudo apt-get install secure-delete
sfill -f -z -l -l -I -v /

Continue reading “Virtualbox Disk Reduce or Disk Compact” »

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Set date/time permanently on Virtualbox Guest

First you need to ssh to the server and be root and then do these step by step:

1. Set the date/time as following format

date -s “2 OCT 2013 18:00:00″

2. Set the proper Timezone for your area-

# cd /etc
# ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/EST localtime

3. Set it to the BIOS for permanent stamp-

# /sbin/hwclock –systohc

On Debian/Ubuntu sytem:

dpkg-reconfigure tzdata

BDST NTP Server:

bsti1.time.gov.bd
bsti2.time.gov.bd

Use tzdata on Centos System:

To use it first download the tzdata package from the repo.

$ sudo yum -y install tzdata
$ tzselect
Please identify a location so that time zone rules can be set correctly.
Please select a continent or ocean.
1) Africa
2) Americas
3) Antarctica
4) Arctic Ocean
5) Asia
6) Atlantic Ocean
7) Australia
8) Europe
9) Indian Ocean
10) Pacific Ocean
11) none – I want to specify the time zone using the Posix TZ format.
#?

Select a value and press the return key to proceed.

You will now be asked a country to select from the list provided.

Please select a country.
1) Aaland Islands 18) Greece 35) Norway
2) Albania 19) Guernsey 36) Poland
3) Andorra 20) Hungary 37) Portugal
4) Austria 21) Ireland 38) Romania
5) Belarus 22) Isle of Man 39) Russia
6) Belgium 23) Italy 40) San Marino
7) Bosnia & Herzegovina 24) Jersey 41) Serbia
8) Britain (UK) 25) Latvia 42) Slovakia
9) Bulgaria 26) Liechtenstein 43) Slovenia
10) Croatia 27) Lithuania 44) Spain
11) Czech Republic 28) Luxembourg 45) Sweden
12) Denmark 29) Macedonia 46) Switzerland
13) Estonia 30) Malta 47) Turkey
14) Finland 31) Moldova 48) Ukraine
15) France 32) Monaco 49) Vatican City
16) Germany 33) Montenegro
17) Gibraltar 34) Netherlands

Select and confirm the selection with 1 for Yes.

This completes the setup but to make it permanent you should add the following line to your ~/.bashrc file.

TZ=’Europe/London’; export TZ

Then log out and back in again.

The user can now log in and run the date command

$ date

Fri Jul 19 14:56:53 BST 20

On Centos 7

To list all available time zones, you can either list the files in the /usr/share/zoneinfo directory or use the timedatectl command.

timedatectl list-timezones
...
America/Tijuana
America/Toronto
America/Tortola
America/Vancouver
America/Whitehorse
America/Winnipeg
...

Once you identify which time zone is accurate to your location, run the following command as sudo user:

sudo timedatectl set-timezone your_time_zone

For example, to change the system’s timezone to America/Toronto:

sudo timedatectl set-timezone America/Toronto

Run the timedatectl command to verify the changes:

timedatectl
Local time: Wed 2019-02-06 17:47:10 EST
Universal time: Wed 2019-02-06 22:47:10 UTC
RTC time: Wed 2019-02-06 22:47:10
Time zone: America/Toronto (EST, -0500)
NTP enabled: no
NTP synchronized: yes
RTC in local TZ: no
DST active: no
Last DST change: DST ended at
Sun 2018-11-04 01:59:59 EDT
Sun 2018-11-04 01:00:00 EST
Next DST change: DST begins (the clock jumps one hour forward) at
Sun 2019-03-10 01:59:59 EST
Sun 2019-03-10 03:00:00 EDT
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