How to remove Virtualbox extpack

The following commands show examples how to list extension packs and remove one:

$ VBoxManage list extpacks
Extension Packs: 1
Pack no. 0: Oracle Virtual Machine VirtualBox Extension Pack
Version: 4.1.12
Revision: 77218
Edition:
Description: USB 2.0 Host Controller, VirtualBox RDP, PXE ROM with E1000 support.
VRDE Module: VBoxVRDP
Usable: true
Why unusable:

Now Remove or Uninstall extpack as following:

$ VBoxManage extpack uninstall "Oracle Virtual Machine VirtualBox Extension Pack"
0%...10%...20%...30%...40%...50%...60%...70%...80%...90%...100%
Successfully uninstalled "Oracle Virtual Machine VirtualBox Extension Pack".
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Virtualbox fixing VRDE on 0.0.0.0 instead 127.0.0.1

By default, Remote Display only works on localhost / 127.0.0.1 and cannot be accessed by ip address or hostname.

Check VRDE / Remote Display IP Address
You can check VRDE / Remote Display ip address using the following methods:

Open command prompt and run netstat -an |find /i “listening” or netstat -an |find /i “[PORT_NUMBER]” and you shall notice it is listening on 127.0.0.1:PORT. Continue reading “Virtualbox fixing VRDE on 0.0.0.0 instead 127.0.0.1” »

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Reinstall VirtualBox on Ubuntu & CentOS

For Ubuntu

To remove virtualbox

sudo dpkg --list virtualbox-*
sudo apt autoremove --purge virtualbox*
dpkg -l virtualbox* | grep ^i

Remove all PPAs from sources.list and source.list.d directory

mkdir ~/apt-tmp
sudo mv /etc/apt/sources.list.d/* ~/apt-tmp

Make sure there is nothing except official repositories sources in /etc/sources.list. And update your sources:

sudo apt update

Now we can search to see which versions are available to install:

apt-cache madison virtualbox | grep -iv sources

Which produces an output like this:

virtualbox | 5.0.32-dfsg-0ubuntu1.16.04.2 | http://mirrors.kernel.org/ubuntu xenial-updates/multiverse amd64 Packages
virtualbox | 5.0.18-dfsg-2build1 | http://mirrors.kernel.org/ubuntu xenial/multiverse amd64 Packages

Then I would install the last version mentioned in xenial-updates: Continue reading “Reinstall VirtualBox on Ubuntu & CentOS” »

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Resizing a VirtualBox Virtual Hard Disk

Prerequisites
Before you start this procedure you’ll need to do the following.

  • Make sure you have the VBoxManage command-line tool installed on your host system.
  • Download the ISO for a GParted Live CD or else a Linux Live CD using a Linux distribution that includes the GParted partition editor utility.
  • IMPORTANT: If the virtual disk you want to resize is attached to a virtual machine with snapshots, you will need to delete these snapshots so that all disk state information is merged into the base virtual disk VDI file.
  • Resize the virtual disk (VirtualBox version 4.0+ only)
    If you are using VirtualBox version 4.0 or later, you can resize the logical capacity of a virtual disk using the VBoxManage modifyhd –resize command.

On the host system, run the following command:

cd /path/to/vbox/disks
VBoxManage modifyhd OldDisk.vdi –-resize 30000

where OldDisk.vdi is the filename of the virtual disk VDI file you want enlarge and 30000 is the new maximum size (in megabytes) of the virtual disk.

If your host OS is Windows, then the commands you need to enter at the Command Prompt will look more like the following. Continue reading “Resizing a VirtualBox Virtual Hard Disk” »

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Install VirtualBox on Centos 6 / 7

Step 1 – Add Required Yum Repositories

Firstly you are required to add VirtualBox yum repository in your system. Download repository file from its official site and place it under at /etc/yum.repos.d/virtualbox.repo .First navigate to /etc/yum.repos.d/ directory and use one of below commands as per your operating system.

cd /etc/yum.repos.d/
wget http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/rpm/rhel/virtualbox.repo

The CentOS and RedHat users also required to add EPEL yum repository using one of the following commands.

### On CentOS/RHEL 7 ### 
rpm -Uvh http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/epel-release-latest-7.noarch.rpm
### On CentOS/RHEL 6 ### 
rpm -Uvh http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm

Step 2 – Install Required Packages

Before installing VirtualBox make sure to install all required packages to run VirtualBox like kernel-headers, kernel-devels etc. Use the following command to install the required packages. Continue reading “Install VirtualBox on Centos 6 / 7” »

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Converting OVA for use with KVM / QCOW2

The OVA file is nothing more than a TAR archive, containing the .OVF and .VMDK files. Easy!

Using Evergreen ILS for example:

~ $ file Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze.ova

Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze.ova: POSIX tar archive (GNU). I’ts possible to use the tar command to list the contents

~ $ tar -tf Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze.ova 
Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze.ovf
Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze-disk1.vmdk

Simply extract those things…

~ $ tar -xvf Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze.ova
Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze.ovf
Evergreen_trunk_Squeeze-disk1.vmdk

Continue reading “Converting OVA for use with KVM / QCOW2” »

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Convert .ova and import it on Proxmox KVM virtualization

Let’s start uploading the exported ova file to the proxmox server. Extract the OVA file:

tar -xvf *.ova

This should output a couple of files from the OVA container, it should include an OVF file, which is the VM Defenition file, and a VMDK file, which is the actual hard disk image. Again, this may take a while.

Convert the vmdk to a Proxmox compatible qcow2 file:

qemu-img convert -f vmdk myvirtual-disk1.vmdk  -O qcow2 qcowdisk.qcow2

We now need to get the image into a VM with some hardware so that we can begin to use it. This is where things get tricky – the OVF file is not compatible with Proxmox and needs to be manually understood. The principle here is we are going to use the Proxmox web GUI to create a VM and replace the empty disk image which is created with our recently converted qcow2 image.

You can use vi to open the OVF file and understand some of the basic settings which are required for the VM. Open the OVF file and look for the following XML tags:

  • OperatingSystemSection
  • VirtualHardwareSection
  • Network
  • StorageControllers

Continue reading “Convert .ova and import it on Proxmox KVM virtualization” »

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Phpvirtualbox fix on 5.1 using 5.0

I was able to get v5.0-5 working with vbox 5.1 by commenting out the version check line and replacing it with a static value in the endpoints/api.php file:

// $response['data']['responseData']['phpvboxver'] = @constant('PHPVBOX_VER');
 $response['data']['responseData']['phpvboxver'] = "5.1-0";

Src: https://sourceforge.net/p/phpvirtualbox/discussion/general/thread/565b7f31/

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Understanding Virtualbox network interfaces

To create and experiment with all kinds of networks without the risk (or taking the trouble) of creating an actual one. And here is where VirtualBox excels by providing several options for networking out of the box. VirtualBox installs an additional NIC (Network Interface Card) on your host computer to identify itself while communicating with the guest. By default the host gets an IP address of 192.168.56.1. You can change the network modes, IP and other network settings by right-clicking your virtual machine on the left and clicking Settings. These are the networking modes that work with VirtualBox guest computers:

NAT (Default)
Host-only Network (Most secure)
Bridged Network (Least secure)
Internal-Network (Betweeen guests only)
Not Attached (No connectivity, guest isolated)
NAT: By default, the networking mode for your virtual machine is NAT (Network Address Translation) mode. This works something like this: Continue reading “Understanding Virtualbox network interfaces” »

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