Best free bandwidth monitoring software and tools to analyze network traffic usage

To keep an eye on the health of your network and diagnose problems that crop up, an essential activity is monitoring your bandwidth and knowing which traffic is consuming it.

Your ISP promises to provide you with a reliable pipe to the Internet of a certain volume; your chosen network hardware install is designed to provide a particular level of service within your facility. Are you getting your expected bandwidth and availability, or is something failing to deliver? Is there unexpected traffic consuming the bandwidth that you are getting?

Tools to monitor bandwidth can leverage various traffic-monitoring technologies. A host can observe all the packets passing by a particular network interface (that is, packet capture). Most managed network devices – and hosts – support SNMP, and so they can be queried to get performance statistics. If your network devices support a traffic monitoring protocol like NetFlow or sFlow, they can publish traffic data to your monitoring tool.

Which bandwidth monitoring tooling is right for you? There are several considerations. One factor is what monitoring technologies your installed hardware supports (eg, do they support SNMP? NetFlow? sFlow?). One is the size and complexity of your network; a simple tool that’s a great fit for a small office is completely inadequate for a large sophisticated network. Here we’ll look at the most popular and feature-rich free bandwidth monitoring tools.

Here’s a list of the best free bandwidth monitoring tools:

  • SolarWinds Real-Time Bandwidth Monitor
  • WhatsUpGold
  • SoftPerfect NetWorx
  • Manage Engine Bandwidth Monitor
  • PRTG
  • ntopng

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How to Monitor your Linux and Windows Servers with CloudStats

CloudStats is a server monitoring service which allows you to monitor your whole server infrastructure from a single dashboard interface and helps timely to prevent any kind of technical issues and downtimes. With CloudStats it is possible to monitor Linux servers, including those on CentOS, Debian, Fedora, Ubuntu etc.

CloudStats server monitoring Agent collects data about all key server metrics such as CPU, RAM and disk space usage, as well as a status of networks, processes, URLs or IPs. This information will be kept and displayed in your CloudStats account interface.

Almost every user can easily setup and run CloudStats without any special skills or knowledge.

Here is an instruction of how to perform Linux server monitoring using CloudStats.

1. Go to sign-up page and create a new account by adding your “Subdomain” name, it could be anything like your company name or website name (in our example – ‘ravisaive‘).

2. In the CloudStats online interface you can add your server for monitoring. To add new server click on the green button “Add New Monitor” and select “Add New Server”. Continue reading “How to Monitor your Linux and Windows Servers with CloudStats” »

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Monitoring multiple server using Munin on Debian/Ubuntu Distribution

 

This tutorial was written for Debian Etch, but the configuration should apply to other distributions with little changes as well.

I want to say first that this is not the only way of setting up such a system. There are many ways of achieving this goal but this is the way I take. I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you!

 

1 Preliminary Note

Our munin server's hostname is server1.example.com (IP address: 192.168.0.100), and we have a web site www.example.com on it with the document root /var/www/www.example.com/web on it.

I'm using one munin client here, server2.example.com (IP address: 192.168.0.101). Of course, you can add as many client systems as you like.

 

2 Install And Configure munin On The Server

munin server (server1.example.com):

To install the munin client and server on Debian Etch, we do this:

apt-get install munin munin-node

Next, we must edit the munin configuration file /etc/munin/munin.conf. We want munin to put its output into the directory Continue reading “Monitoring multiple server using Munin on Debian/Ubuntu Distribution” »

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