Linux CHMOD Change user & group ownership

Learn how to change the owner and group ownership of files and directories with the chown and chgrp commands. Caution: you need to do this whiled logged in as 'root' user. In order to set the ownership of a directory and all the files in that directory, you'll need the -R option: $ chown -R username somedir Here, R stands for recursive because this command will recursively change the ownership of directories and their contents. After issuing this example command, the user username will be the owner of the directory somedir, as well as every file in that directory. Tell what happens: $ chown -v username somefile changed ownership of 'somefile' to username Here, v stands for verbose. If you use the -v option, chown will list what it did (or didn't do) to the file. The verbose mode is especially useful if you change the ownership of several files at once. For example, this could happen when you do it recursively: $ chown -Rv username somedir changed ownership of 'somedir/' to username changed ownership of 'somedir/boringfile' to username changed ownership of 'somedir/somefile' to username The options of using chgrp are the same as using chown. So, for example, the -R and -v options will work with it just like they worked with chown: $ chgrp -Rv usergroup somedir changed group of 'somedir/' to usergroup changed group of 'somedir/boringfile' to usergroup changed group of 'somedir/somefile' to usergroup chown nicely reports to you what it did to each file.

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